Arts & Entertainment

08/08/2016 - 11:07am
Thoughts Of A Jazz Lover Jazz can be enigmatic, an alchemy of mysterious sounds and moods that is spontaneous and yet deliberate in its free flowing creativity. There is a high note of haughtiness, perhaps a sort of natural aristocracy from a kind of inbred austerity about jazz that puts it in a class by itself, elevating the music to a higher form of consciousness. Your mind clears, your body relaxes and suddenly life smiles at you. Jazz is beautiful music. Just listen and enjoy. The Brazilian... >>more
08/08/2016 - 10:12am
Quintin Peterson is a local artist and critically acclaimed author of crime fiction. A retired DC police officer, he currently works at the Folger Shakespeare Library, which is the setting for his novella “Guarding Shakespeare.” His poems have been published in the Albatross Literary Magazine and in the poetry anthology “In a Different Light.” The poem below is taken from his first book of poetry, “Nativity,” in which he wrestles with themes of love, race,... >>more
08/08/2016 - 10:12am
Down But Not Out Melia Hoyle is six years and four monthsfrom turning 21, but she’s got all the weight of the adult world on her skinny shoulders. It’s 1934, in the midst of the Great Depression, and Melia’s mother, who runs a little gas station in the Blue Ridge, has up and died. Melia’s never known her daddy, so she’s the only thing standing between her two younger siblings and the dreaded “Fos Ter Care.” Then a Shakespeare-quoting bum falls off the... >>more
08/08/2016 - 9:13am
This is life that escaped the wrath and rampage of man – peaceful yet somehow stirring, taking you to that primeval place where our ancestors stood in awe of the natural world. Andrei Kushnir is in love with that world and for him the night is simply a wait for the sunrise and the light that compels him to paint. I wrote that 10 years ago, and Andrei still waits for the light that compels him to paint. But the primeval places are not just the unspoiled landscapes of prehistory. They... >>more
08/06/2016 - 11:17am
‘Indignation’ Philip Roth has written over 25 novels in the past 50 years, making him one of America’s most eminent authors. With that prodigious output, he has inevitably been scouted by Hollywood for potential adaptations. However, perhaps because of their literary complexity, only a few of his novels have reached the screen, and none has proved a blockbuster. One of them, “Goodbye, Columbus” (1969), won decent reviews and box office, but others – such as... >>more
06/30/2016 - 11:12am
Thoughts Of A Jazz Lover Jazz can be enigmatic, an alchemy of mysterious sounds and moods that is spontaneous and yet deliberate in its free flowing creativity. There is a high note of haughtiness, perhaps a sort of natural aristocracy from a kind of inbred austerity about jazz that puts it in a class by itself, elevating the music to a higher form of consciousness. Your mind clears, your body relaxes and suddenly life smiles at you. Jazz is beautiful music. Just listen and enjoy.   Turn... >>more
06/30/2016 - 10:12am
Sleuth Extraordinaire The government shut-down has all but emptied the corridors of power, but there’s no rest for Kit Marshall. The staffer who discovered her Senate boss dead in “Stabbing in the Senate” finds herself once again embroiled in murder. Thankfully this time she’s not a person of interest. Unfortunately her new boss, the freshman congresswoman from North Carolina, is suspect numero uno. “I already recovered once on Capitol Hill from being labeled a... >>more
06/29/2016 - 10:25am
Artist Revisit: Jan Kern “Jan Kern is on an expedition through time, maybe timelessness, connecting societies, peoples, and eons. The cultures could be Egyptian, Spanish, Navajo – or Capitol Hill on any afternoon.” I wrote that in 2002. If anything, Jan’s work has become not just timeless but a passage through the rhythms of human intelligence to the deliberate beginnings – back to the cultivation of vision and the awakening of the mind to the very idea of form and... >>more
06/29/2016 - 9:42am
‘Genius’ Individual creators creating – that most interior of acts – has always been difficult, if not impossible, to treat in the cinema, which best exhibits a tactile reality in a world of movement, not the inner workings of the mind. Years of biopics about famous writers, composers, scientists, and artists prove this again and again. A recent example: “The Man Who Knew Infinity,” wherein the film can only mimic a gifted mathematician’s wrestling with... >>more